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Editing Univariate data visualization

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One of the most common modifications made to graphs is to add a three-dimensional effect.  Below is the bar chart showing the distribution of support for the Tea Party, plus the same bar chart with a three dimensional effect added.   
 
One of the most common modifications made to graphs is to add a three-dimensional effect.  Below is the bar chart showing the distribution of support for the Tea Party, plus the same bar chart with a three dimensional effect added.   
 
 
[[File:tea_party_bar_chart.png]]
 
[[File:tea_party_bar_chart.png]]
[[File:tea_party_3d_bar_chart.png]]
+
[[File:tea_party_3D_bar_chart.png]]
 
These graphs use exactly the same data, but they appear quite different.  For instance, the regular bar chart shows quite clearly that more than 200 people in the sample strongly disagree with the Tea Party; however, the three-dimensional graph makes it appear that there are fewer than 200 people in the sample who strongly disagree with this statement.  The same is true of the "Agree" category:  while the regular bar chart makes it clear that there are about 400 people in the sample who agree with the Tea Party, the three-dimensional effect graph makes it appear that there are fewer than 400.  This example illustrates why it is so important to consider carefully what kinds of effects should be added to your graph.
 
These graphs use exactly the same data, but they appear quite different.  For instance, the regular bar chart shows quite clearly that more than 200 people in the sample strongly disagree with the Tea Party; however, the three-dimensional graph makes it appear that there are fewer than 200 people in the sample who strongly disagree with this statement.  The same is true of the "Agree" category:  while the regular bar chart makes it clear that there are about 400 people in the sample who agree with the Tea Party, the three-dimensional effect graph makes it appear that there are fewer than 400.  This example illustrates why it is so important to consider carefully what kinds of effects should be added to your graph.
  

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